PaperClip Incorporated

The Bridges Blog

Since 1995, Mike has served as President, Vice President of Marketing & Sales, Director of Professional Services,and Consultant for PaperClip Incorporated. In his current role, he is responsible for strategic direction,operations, and corporate communications. Prior to joining PaperClip Software, Mike was the Executive Vice President and co-founder of CMF Design System, a custom software and systems integration firm. Mike received a Bachelor of Science from Rowan University and served as a Captain in the United States Marine Corps.

As we continue to talk about creating a cyber security plan, we have to touch on infrastructure and systems management.The potential privacy impact is assessed when new processes involving personal information are implemented, and when changes are made to such processes (including any such activities outsourced to third parties or contractors), and personal information continues to be protected in accordance with the privacy policies. For this purpose, processes involving personal information include the design, acquisition, development, implementation, configuration, modification and management of the following:

Do you have a plan to combat cyber threats? If you don’t, you need one. And any good plan should include assigning responsibility and accountability for system security. What should this cyber security expert do? Here’s some tips:

The mortgage industry can learn from other industries that are highly regulated and handle a great deal of NPI. Such as, The Life Insurance and Securities industries, which have a significant amount of requirements to comply with compared to any other industries. Agents, Advisors, BGA, BD, Medical Service providers and Carriers handle NPI, PPI, financial, medical, educational information for which they are accountable for. Here are some steps to help your organization build a simple but effective security plan:

The frequency of online attacks against U.S. business continues to increase, along with the cost of defending against those attacks and mitigating any resulting data breaches. Cyber crime now costs a U.S. business $8.9 million per year, an increase of 6% from 2011 and 38% from 2010. Those findings come from the "2012 Cost of Cyber Crime Study," which was sponsored by security intelligence tool vendor HP and released Monday (10/8/2012) by Ponemom Institute. The businesses profiled in the study also reported that on average, they’re collectively seeing 102 successful attacks per week, up 72 attacks per week in 2011 and 50 attacks per week in 2010.